ColdQuanta equipment heading to ISS

BOULDER — One of ColdQuanta Inc.’s supercold atomic sensors will fly to the International Space Station Wednesday for use in near-orbit scientific experiments.

The Boulder-based company’s atomic sensor is among the payload aboard SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket bringing fresh supplies and scientific equipment to the space station. The rocket is due for launch at Cape Canaveral, Florida, at 10 a.m. Mountain Time Wednesday.

ColdQuanta uses lasers to drop atoms to near-absolute zero temperatures. Those frozen atoms are useful for measuring physical forces such as gravity or the movement of time, and are the basis for quantum computing research.

The company has raised about $13.8 million in the past two months between private seed funders and from federal aerospace and defense agency grants.

BOULDER — One of ColdQuanta Inc.’s supercold atomic sensors will fly to the International Space Station Wednesday for use in near-orbit scientific experiments.

The Boulder-based company’s atomic sensor is among the payload aboard SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket bringing fresh supplies and scientific equipment to the space station. The rocket is due for launch at Cape Canaveral, Florida, at 10 a.m. Mountain Time Wednesday.

ColdQuanta uses lasers to drop atoms to near-absolute zero temperatures. Those frozen atoms are useful for measuring physical forces such as gravity or the movement of time, and are the basis for quantum computing research.

The company has raised about $13.8 million in the past two months between private seed funders and from federal aerospace and defense agency grants.