How to bridge life balance and career achievement

Time doesn’t just fly — it zigs, zags and lurches forward. The year 2019 marks the 20th anniversary of the publication of my book, “Bridges To Balance.” These excerpts will change the way you see your career and your life. I’ve seen it happen for two decades. Employees, managers, owners and partners throughout the world have studied these suggestions and found a better life along the way.

I half joke that my purpose in life is to help people; “…live long enough to spend the money you’re trying to earn.” With new reflection, I’d like to divide some of the time-tested maxims into five useful groupings for today’s reader.

Feedback & criticism: When someone you dislike criticizes you, think long and hard about what they say. This may be your best feedback ever. Be vulnerable. Tell people you like and love that you care for them. Slow down and listen when others need to talk. Get regular feedback on your actions. Be aware of this information without letting it rule you. Ask for advice and feedback three separate times. The first and second requests are rarely answered fully or accurately.

Self-esteem: Weed the garden of your life. Rid yourself of bad examples, unhealthy loves and fake friends. Strike back when it means maintaining your self-esteem. When you try to please everyone you live a life of compromise, timidity, and little respect. If you could meet yourself as a young child — what would you say? Say it. The true source of your talent and potential is unwrapped confidence.

Interpersonal skills: Withhold judgment until it’s time; and when it’s time, withhold judgment. Don’t trust blindly. All people are not trustworthy. Be social — smile often. Always send thank you notes. Work on your problems and challenges twice as much as you talk about them.

Managing money: Do your financial planning and accounting. Pay your bills on time. Count your money. Without obsessing, know your net worth. Track your credit card expenses. Know how much each monthly bill will be. Save money before you spend money. Make your first payment of the month to savings or investments.

Achieving goals: Gather ideas and inspiration from outside your field. As Churchill said nine times in a 30-second speech, “Never, never, never give up.” Visually see a symbol or photo of your highest aspiration. Make your goals public and visible by posting them at home or at work. Think and then write down your five highest priorities. Much of your confidence to do tough things will come from having done them before. A large part of genius is patiently waiting. Do the hardest items on your priority list first.

Readers and friends tell me that these little sayings really are bridges to their balance and achievement. Occasionally revisit these nuggets and watch them burrow into your brain and your life. Don’t mistake them for casual bumper stickers or general social media memes. Each item was written with the balanced achiever in mind.

Masters throughout history have taught us to learn the simple truths of the world we live in. I suggest we take the time to build habits around those truths. So, live well, know your place in history and, spend some of that money.

Rick Griggs is the former Intel Corporation training manager and inventor of the rolestorming creativity tool. He speaks on mastery, balance and innovation. rick.griggs83@gmail.com or 970-690-7327.

Time doesn’t just fly — it zigs, zags and lurches forward. The year 2019 marks the 20th anniversary of the publication of my book, “Bridges To Balance.” These excerpts will change the way you see your career and your life. I’ve seen it happen for two decades. Employees, managers, owners and partners throughout the world have studied these suggestions and found a better life along the way.

I half joke that my purpose in life is to help people; “…live long enough to spend the money you’re trying to earn.” With new reflection, I’d like to divide some of the time-tested maxims into five useful groupings for today’s reader.

Feedback & criticism: When someone you dislike criticizes you, think long and hard about what they say. This may be your best feedback ever. Be vulnerable. Tell people you like and love that you care for them. Slow down and listen when others need to talk. Get regular feedback on your actions. Be aware of this information without letting it rule you. Ask for advice and feedback three separate times. The first and second requests are rarely answered fully or accurately.

Self-esteem: Weed the garden of your life. Rid yourself of bad examples, unhealthy loves and fake friends. Strike back when it means maintaining your self-esteem. When you try to please everyone you live a life of compromise, timidity, and little respect. If you could meet yourself as a young child — what would you…