October 28, 2022

Top Docs Q&A: Dr. Mansi Parikh, MD

Glaucoma/General Ophthalmology

Eye Care Center of Northern Colorado, PC

EDUCATION: Jefferson Medical College

BOARD CERTIFICATION: Opthalmology


Q: What interested you in ophthalmology versus other areas of medicine?

A: My grandmother unfortunately had quite advanced macular degeneration at a time when there were few good treatments.  I watched her lose her independence due to vision loss when I was quite young, and it made me very sensitive to vision related problems.  Working in a field that helps people maintain and improve their quality of life is very rewarding.

Q: You taught and worked at the Oregon Health and Sciences University for eight years. What did you yourself learn from that experience?

A: I spent almost 100% of my time teaching residents/fellows about glaucoma and caring for patients with all stages of the disease.  For anyone who manages glaucoma, it becomes quickly clear how different the disease course can be for different people.  There is no standard formula for managing this disease and it is so important to involve each individual in management decisions.

Q: Do glaucoma and cataracts share any common risk factors? What should patients know about these two conditions?

A: Both glaucoma and cataracts are more prevalent with age, but one rarely causes the other.  Cataracts are thankfully reversible with cataract surgery.  Glaucoma, on the other hand, is not curable and is a chronic disease that requires lifelong treatment.  The best outcomes come if glaucoma is diagnosed early, when there are absolutely no symptoms.  Glaucoma can be diagnosed on a routine eye exam and is just one reason it is important to have regular eye care even if you don’t notice any vision problems.

Q: What are the treatment options for glaucoma and cataracts?

A: The main treatment for cataracts is surgical removal.  With modern techniques, cataract surgery is quite fast and very successful. 

Glaucoma treatment is more complicated – it centers around lowering eye pressure to prevent optic nerve damage, and the amount of pressure lowering needed will vary between people.  There are medical, laser and surgical treatment to lower eye pressure.  It is best to discuss the options with your doctor if you have glaucoma. 

Q: Do you have relatives who have experienced glaucoma or cataracts?

A: I don’t have any immediate relatives with glaucoma, but everyone eventually develops cataracts.  My father recently had cataract surgery and is seeing great!

Q: What kind of hobbies and interests do you have outside medicine?

A: I love to be outside in this beautiful state.  You’ll find me in the mountains when I have free time, biking in the summer and skiing in the winter.  I also love to travel.

Q: What are you watching on Netflix?

A: Right now, Chef’s Table.  I love a good cooking show/competition!

Q: “If I wasn’t a doctor, I would be …”

A: A travel consultant – I love to research and plan trips.   

Glaucoma/General Ophthalmology

Eye Care Center of Northern Colorado, PC

EDUCATION: Jefferson Medical College

BOARD CERTIFICATION: Opthalmology


Q: What interested you in ophthalmology versus other areas of medicine?

A: My grandmother unfortunately had quite advanced macular degeneration at a time when there were few good treatments.  I watched her lose her independence due to vision loss when I was quite young, and it made me very sensitive to vision related problems.  Working in a field that helps people maintain and improve their quality of life is very rewarding.

Q: You taught and worked at the Oregon Health and Sciences University for eight years. What did you…