February 1, 1998

Finding a foothold in digital frontier

Futurists, pundits and guidance counselors everywhere are rushing to define emerging industries and job trends in the new “digital revolution.”

In fact, Don Altman, a two-time Emmy Award winning TV and documentary writer, multimedia producer, and co-creator of an online interactive comic strip, believes we are already in the revolution’s “second wave.”

“Now that these digital tools exist, the next wave demands people who can apply them to virtually every aspect of business and personal life,” Altman says

SPONSORED CONTENT

5 ways to boost your business with solar

Namaste Solar has helped businesses from all different industries and verticals invest in on-site solar. Whether you are a top public university, outdoor gear retailer, or local dog toy manufacturer, most property owners can benefit from solar in these five ways.

Altman’s new book, “The Digital Frontier: Job and Opportunity Finder,” wants us to know what the future holds for tomorrow’s jobs, today — jobs for “cyber cops,” electronic publishers, videoconferencing specialists, virtual reality photographers and virtual set designers.

Anyone can see the progress of digital prowess, since it’s measured by anything possessing a computer chip, the book says.

Today’s graphic artist, for instance, at corporations like Microsoft Corp. or American Online, now has the dubious distinction of being called a “multimedia designer.” Yesterday’s executives now are being called “managers of technical evangelism” or “vice president’s of cool.”

The “digital frontier” is boundless and still needs a lot of exploring, but if you want to be a pioneer in search of new territories and opportunities you’ve got to have the right skills and foresight to make it, Altman says.

Altman paints a broad overview of emerging opportunities and the skills needed for those jobs in the first section of the book, interspersed with fascinating statistics and predictions.

For example, by 2,000 there are anticipated to be 550 million Internet users alone, which begs the questions: What will be the hottest emerging world markets? (All bets are on the Asian markets of China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, South Korea and Indonesia.) What digital-related job sectors are expected to grow, and by what percent? (Hint: Count on technicians, health diagnosing and treating, computer and mathematical scientists, and, yes, even writers, artists and entertainers.)

Those are just a few of the kinds of questions Altman’s book answers with credible sources. But what seems most impressive about Altman’s envisioned “digital frontier” is its vast open prairies, where any brave settler has the chance of becoming an successful “infopreneur.”

If you are the kind of person who is intimidated by the thought of the coming merging of multimedia and interactive workplaces, don’t lose heart. Altman believes there is no single way of retooling for the future. He provides some excellent case studies of how people have made digital changes work for them and created jobs for others.

“The Digital Frontier” provides some in-depth industry snapshots and job descriptions for new opportunities in areas like advertising and marketing, creative services, online and communication services.

Learn what “multi-media mapping” is all about, or what an “interactive writer” does. How does being a “game tester” sound as a new occupation? (It’s now a crucial job for software and development companies.) Aspiring lawyers might want to read the job description of an “electronic rights specialist,” or if you’re into searching the most arcane stuff on the Internet, “cyber researching” might be right up your alley.

The Networking Resource Guide (Section II of Altman’s book) is a handy reference listing 300 key contacts for online job searches, job placement, associations, publications, and job training.

“This book is designed for students, entrepreneurs, home-based workers and even seasoned workforce veterans who want to take advantage of the new trends and opportunities rapidly reshaping our world,” says Altman.

A vital companion to Altman’s book is his Digital Jobs Report Web site (http://www.originalvision.com), which gives some average salary ranges for emerging jobs and updates not in the book.

“The Digital Frontier” is a down-to-earth roadmap for anyone interested in new job trends.

Futurists, pundits and guidance counselors everywhere are rushing to define emerging industries and job trends in the new “digital revolution.”

In fact, Don Altman, a two-time Emmy Award winning TV and documentary writer, multimedia producer, and co-creator of an online interactive comic strip, believes we are already in the revolution’s “second wave.”

“Now that these digital tools exist, the next wave demands people who can apply them to virtually every aspect of business and personal life,” Altman says

Altman’s new book, “The Digital Frontier: Job and Opportunity Finder,”…

Christopher Wood
Christopher Wood is editor and publisher of BizWest, a regional business journal covering Boulder, Broomfield, Larimer and Weld counties. Wood co-founded the Northern Colorado Business Report in 1995 and served as publisher of the Boulder County Business Report until the two publications were merged to form BizWest in 2014. From 1990 to 1995, Wood served as reporter and managing editor of the Denver Business Journal. He is a Marine Corps veteran and a graduate of the University of Colorado Boulder. He has won numerous awards from the Colorado Press Association, Society of Professional Journalists and the Alliance of Area Business Publishers.
Categories:
Sign up for BizWest Daily Alerts