Wolverine Press property scheduled for foreclosure sale next year

FORT COLLINS — The nonprofit Wolverine Farm Publishing and Publick House is facing foreclosure in late January after it couldn’t raise the money to stay current on its mortgage.

The literary house and bar at 316 Willow St. in Fort Collins received its first notice for demand in late September and has been scheduled for a sheriff’s auction on Jan. 29, 2020, according to Larimer County property records.

As of Sept. 25, Wolverine owes $769,630 on loan with a principal of $725,000 and at 3 percent interest. Its deadline to say it plans to cure the foreclosure is Jan. 14, and its final chance to get current on payments in Jan. 28.

Wolverine Farm was originally formed in 2003 to publish the alternative newspaper “Matterzine” and became a nonprofit in 2005. It purchased its current building just north of Old Town in 2013.

In July, the Coloradoan reported Wolverine’s owners were seeking $800,000 in donations to pay down or completely pay off the mortgage. It purchased its 1,200-square-foot building in 2013 using money from anonymous lenders.

It’s unclear if Wolverine has a plan to cure the foreclosure demand. Director Todd Simmons did not respond to a request for comment Friday morning.

FORT COLLINS — The nonprofit Wolverine Farm Publishing and Publick House is facing foreclosure in late January after it couldn’t raise the money to stay current on its mortgage.

The literary house and bar at 316 Willow St. in Fort Collins received its first notice for demand in late September and has been scheduled for a sheriff’s auction on Jan. 29, 2020, according to Larimer County property records.

As of Sept. 25, Wolverine owes $769,630 on loan with a principal of $725,000 and at 3 percent interest. Its deadline to say it plans to cure the foreclosure is Jan. 14, and its final chance to get current on payments in Jan. 28.

Wolverine Farm was originally formed in 2003 to publish the alternative newspaper “Matterzine” and became a nonprofit in 2005. It purchased its current building just north of Old Town in 2013.

In July, the Coloradoan reported Wolverine’s owners were seeking $800,000 in donations to pay down or completely pay off the mortgage. It purchased its 1,200-square-foot building in 2013 using money from anonymous lenders.

It’s unclear if Wolverine has a plan to cure the foreclosure demand. Director Todd Simmons did not respond to a request for comment Friday morning.