Editorial: MacQuiddy’s departure leaves huge void for Greeley Chamber

The Greeley Area Chamber of Commerce begins 2019 with a challenge: how to replace Sarah MacQuiddy, its longtime president, who announced her retirement at the organization’s annual banquet, Feb. 21. That gathering at Island Grove Regional Park attracted a record 1,056 attendees — testament to MacQuiddy’s impact on the chamber and its programs.

And while such attendance might be attributed to the fact that the chamber is celebrating its 100th anniversary, it should be noted that the banquet breaks records year after year. That’s due to the hard work exhibited by MacQuiddy and her team, and the fact that the event is simply fun.

The chamber board of directors will initiate a national search to replace MacQuiddy, who officially will step down June 30 after 15 years as president. She spent 10 years prior to that leading the Greeley Convention and Visitors Bureau.

So what should the Greeley Chamber’s board of directors seek in a replacement? In short, someone a lot like Sarah MacQuiddy — someone who can:

  • Build strong relationships with key organizations in Greeley, including the city, Weld County, the University of Northern Colorado and the nonprofit sector.
  • Work to build programs that support key industries, including agribusiness and energy. MacQuiddy has been a strong advocate of Energy Proud, which educates the public about the importance of Weld County’s energy economy.
  • Collaborate with other regional organizations, including the Fort Collins Area Chamber of Commerce, the Loveland Chamber of Commerce, economic-development agencies and other groups on regional issues, including transportation, workforce development, water and more. Such collaboration includes the Northern Colorado Legislative Alliance, which magnifies the voice of local chambers at the state Legislature.
  • Advocate for business interests with local, county and state government.
  • Keep the “fun” in networking events such as the annual dinner, Prairie Dog Classic golf tournament, etc.
  • Continue the good work that’s been done to build a new reputation for Greeley as a growing community with a solid economy.
  • Maintain the chamber’s strong financial health, something MacQuiddy worked hard to improve, including during the Great Recession.

MacQuiddy has been a model of stability, sound management and innovation at the Greeley Chamber. We trust that the board will recognize that the qualities that made her so successful will be essential in her replacement.

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Click here to read a 2019 One-on-One interview with Sarah MacQuiddy.

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Click here to read Sarah MacQuiddy’s profile from 2014 Women of Distinction.

The Greeley Area Chamber of Commerce begins 2019 with a challenge: how to replace Sarah MacQuiddy, its longtime president, who announced her retirement at the organization’s annual banquet, Feb. 21. That gathering at Island Grove Regional Park attracted a record 1,056 attendees — testament to MacQuiddy’s impact on the chamber and its programs.

And while such attendance might be attributed to the fact that the chamber is celebrating its 100th anniversary, it should be noted that the banquet breaks records year after year. That’s due to the hard work exhibited by MacQuiddy and her team, and the fact that the event is simply fun.

The chamber board of directors will initiate a national search to replace MacQuiddy, who officially will step down June 30 after 15 years as president. She spent 10 years prior to that leading the Greeley Convention and Visitors Bureau.

So what should the Greeley Chamber’s board of directors seek in a replacement? In short, someone a lot like Sarah MacQuiddy — someone who can:

  • Build strong relationships with key organizations in Greeley, including the city, Weld County, the University of Northern Colorado and the nonprofit sector.
  • Work to build programs that support key industries, including agribusiness and energy. MacQuiddy has been a strong advocate of Energy Proud, which educates the public about the importance of Weld County’s energy economy.
  • Collaborate with other…