Manufacturing drives Broomfield’s economy

Jennifer Kerr

Manufacturing has been and continues to be the backbone of economic productivity in the United States. According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, manufacturing has a larger multiplier effect than any other major economic activity. One dollar spent in manufacturing generates $1.35 in additional economic activity. Also, jobs in manufacturing actually translate into additional jobs in other parts of the economy.

On average, one new manufacturing job produces 1.6 additional jobs in local service businesses, according to the Research Institute of Industrial Economics. They also stated that jobs in high-tech manufacturing industries create five local service jobs.

Broomfield is home to nearly 125 manufacturing businesses. Many are in Broomfield’s original Research and Industrial District. Dating back to the 1950s, this is one of the original research and development districts in the area.

According to the City and County of Broomfield, the size of the area is more than 350 acres and a portion is available for new development. It exemplifies creating jobs in close proximity to a major intersection (U.S. Highways 36 and 287) and uses the surrounding landscape to separate employment development from residential development.

Although this is considered an industrial area, 84 percent of the jobs belong to office and professional workers who are highly educated with more than 36 percent having a bachelor’s degree or above. Another interesting fact is that the majority of the employees live within 30 minutes of their workplace.

Some of the larger manufacturing firms in Broomfield include Ball Corp., Hunter Douglas, Sandoz, Allen Co. and Checkers Industrial Safety Products.

One of the fastest growing manufacturers is the craft-beer industry. Currently Broomfield is home to four breweries. Big Choice Brewing was the first, opening in 2012, and now is joined by 4 Noses Brewing, Nighthawk Brewery and Wonderland Brewing Co. Broomfield is not just about brews. Turquoise Mesa Winery has been offering a wide variety of red and white wines using the finest Colorado grapes from the Western Slope since 2005.

The status of manufacturing continues to be tough and strong, thanks to the hard work and innovation of those in the industry. They are problem solvers who use inventive solutions to fix or improve a multitude of challenges; sometimes they address challenges that we may never have thought of in our daily lives. For example, if you tour Checkers, you will see Cable Protectors. These prove to be very important for safety to protect your favorite band during a rock concert or to record your time during a marathon race. Each of their products is produced in the United States, and they have been providing their products and services worldwide for more than 25 years.

There are many unique manufacturing firms in Broomfield. The Allen Co., founded in 1970, is a leading supplier of hunting, shooting, archery and outdoor products. It also supports conservation efforts. Main Street Pedicabs has been designing human-powered pedal vehicles since 1992.  The Kitchen Coop provides a safe, flexible and structured manufacturing environment to support wholesale food and beverage brands. 

Commercial printing, search detection and navigation instruments, miscellaneous textile product mills, machine shops, semiconductors and sign production are just some of the many other sectors of manufacturing in Broomfield.

Recent statistics from Reference USA show that nearly 40 percent of these Broomfield manufacturers have sales volumes ranging from $1 million to $5 million, and more than 40 percent have sales volumes ranging from $5 million to $50 million. 

Manufacturers are facing some challenges such as finding and retaining the right talent, providing a safe work environment and employing lean manufacturing principles to eliminate waste throughout the organization and instilling a culture of excellence through processes that are repeatable and sustainable. 

The North Metro Denver Small Business Development Center is working together with the Broomfield Chamber to offer process center consulting to cultivate growth and strengthen the Broomfield manufacturing community. A forum has been created for manufacturing professionals to share best practices, exchange knowledge and discuss those issues common to their industry. The City and County of Broomfield’s Economic Development Department also is  working closely with all Broomfield manufacturers to help them thrive.

Since manufacturing is the backbone of economic productivity, creates jobs and invigorates the economy, it is important that we address their needs and support their innovative and creative problem solving.

Jennifer Kerr is president and chief executive of the Broomfield Chamber of Commerce and Broomfield Business Resource Center.

Jennifer Kerr

Manufacturing has been and continues to be the backbone of economic productivity in the United States. According to the Bureau of Economic Analysis, manufacturing has a larger multiplier effect than any other major economic activity. One dollar spent in manufacturing generates $1.35 in additional economic activity. Also, jobs in manufacturing actually translate into additional jobs in other parts of the economy.

On average, one new manufacturing job produces 1.6 additional jobs in local service businesses, according to the Research Institute of Industrial Economics. They also stated that jobs in high-tech manufacturing industries create five local service jobs.

Broomfield is home to nearly 125 manufacturing businesses. Many are in Broomfield’s original Research and Industrial District. Dating back to the 1950s, this is one of the original research and development districts in the area.

According to the City and County of Broomfield, the size of the area is more than 350 acres and a portion is available for new development. It exemplifies creating jobs in close proximity to a major intersection (U.S. Highways 36 and 287) and uses the surrounding landscape to separate employment development from residential development.

Although this is considered an industrial area, 84 percent of the jobs belong to office and professional workers who are highly educated with more than 36 percent having a bachelor’s degree or above. Another interesting fact is that the majority of the employees…