Top four myths in the job-search process

As a recruiter, I can tell you from both sides of the table what works and what doesn’t when you’re looking for a job. Most people have heard their share of advice from friends and family when they begin their job search, some of it is even profitable. However, I have found that several misconceptions continue to be perpetuated. Below are the top myths I want to bust before you start looking.

Myth 1: “Getting a job is a numbers game. The more resumes I send out, the faster I’ll get a job.”

If you are sending out a bunch of resumes and you are not getting interviews, then something is wrong with your resume. As recruiters, here’s what makes us put the resume in the “Interview” pile:

• It is a format that is easy to read, tells us about you quickly and is typo free.

• The positions you’re applying for are similar to the positions you’ve held.

• It is relevant to the job. Everything on your resume must align with the job description and be 100 percent truthful. The required skills indicated on the job description should match the skills on your resume.

Myth 2: “If I’m getting interviews, I should get offers.”

If you are getting interviews but not getting offers, something is breaking down during the interview. You need to plan for your interview by reviewing the job description. Highlight three – and only three – of your best qualities and make sure your stories are relevant and truthful. Your goals are to become known, liked and prove that you’re capable of the position.

Myth 3: “I should follow a dream no matter what. The money will follow.”

I am not a dream buster, but this is simply not true. The easiest and fastest way to get a new job is by doing the same role in the same industry, but for a different company. If you don’t love this work, then the next easiest opportunity is the same role for a different industry. The third path is to get a different role in the same industry. It is difficult because you need to convince people that already know you in one role to accept you as being proficient in another.

The most difficult transition is to apply for a new role in a new industry. This is the route I typically see people take who are following a dream. It is possible, but you need to know that it takes tremendous energy to make this happen. We love helping people put a career path in place to meet a dream, but it takes effort, education and time. Bottom line: If you hate the work you’ve been doing, and you need a new job, you probably need some help laying out a career path that will help you live your dream while still earning a living.

Myth 4: “Monster.com has most of the open jobs listed.”

Actually, only about 60 percent of the open jobs show up on the various job sites. Many companies will post on one job board in conjunction with their career page in order to save money. If you use only Monster.com to look for jobs, and a company with your perfect job used Craigslist, you will never hear of the opportunity.

We utilize proprietary technology which pulls all the major job boards together, and then access our growing database of local companies who don’t typically advertise on the big job sites. To really get a picture of every open position, you need to follow all boards and company websites. This is extremely time consuming and difficult unless you already have a handful of companies in mind.

Searching for a job can be stressful and time consuming, but if done properly your rewards will be financial and personal. Your success will be determined by planning ahead, utilizing all the tools at your disposal and above all, being honest and prepared. I wish you good luck in your search and new position.

Recruiter Kendra Prospero at Turning the Corner LLC in Boulder can be reached at720-446-8876 or info@turningthecornerllc.com.

As a recruiter, I can tell you from both sides of the table what works and what doesn’t when you’re looking for a job. Most people have heard their share of advice from friends and family when they begin their job search, some of it is even profitable. However, I have found that several misconceptions continue to be perpetuated. Below are the top myths I want to bust before you start looking.

Myth 1: “Getting a job is a numbers game. The more resumes I send out, the faster I’ll get a job.”

If you are sending out a bunch of resumes and you are not getting interviews, then something is wrong with your resume. As recruiters, here’s what makes us put the resume in the “Interview” pile:

• It is a format that is easy to read, tells us about you quickly and is typo free.

• The positions you’re applying for are similar to the positions you’ve held.

• It is relevant to the job. Everything on your resume must align with the job description and be 100 percent truthful. The required skills indicated on the job description should match the skills on your resume.

Myth 2: “If I’m getting interviews, I should get offers.”

If you are getting interviews but not getting offers, something is breaking down during the interview. You need to plan for your interview by reviewing the job description. Highlight three – and only three – of your best qualities and make sure your stories are relevant and truthful. Your goals…