Signatures filed to put GMO label question on ballot

DENVER – Proponents of having food producers being required to place a label on their products if they contain genetically engineered, or GMO, ingredients delivered 167,950 signatures on Monday to the Colorado Secretary of State in support of placing Initiative 48 on the fall-election ballot.

The state requires 86,105 signatures for an initiative to be placed on a ballot. Campaign organizers expect to hear from the Secretary of State within a week to 10 days on whether the GMO labeling measure qualifies.

Supporters of The Right to Know Colorado campaign conducted a rally at the state capital Monday as the signatures were delivered.

“Moms and families in Colorado and across America have the right to know how their food is made,” said Robyn O’Brien, a Colorado resident, author of “The Unhealthy Truth” and founder of the Allergy Kids Foundation. “With the passage of the Colorado bill, we can collect data on trends around the consumption of food that has been genetically engineered. This data is of enormous value and importance to our farmers, our food companies and our economy, especially in light of the surging demand for food that is free from genetically engineered ingredients.”
 
Tryna Cooper, lead proponent of the campaign, said a simple label on the package will not raise prices for consumers. “It will give families the choice, and can help protect Colorado’s economy, in particular agricultural exports, as 64 other countries require the disclosure and labeling of GMOs in foods,” she said.
 


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