May 14, 2004

Could brain fingerprinting be the next polygraph test?

The Eye has been scared to think in public since the Patriot Act came down the pike. With the advent of brain fingerprinting, however, it may give up thought altogether.

It seems that a few local businesspeople, including DaVinci Institute˜s Tom Frey, are forming a task force to establish Colorado as the world leader in brain fingerprinting.

Brain fingerprinting is a kind of next-generation polygraph, but instead of measuring blood pressure and sweat it measures brain waves.

The task force proposes using brain fingerprinting in cold cases and to reduce pre-trial prosecution costs, estimating it could save Colorado $30 million a year.

But anyone who˜s watched "Law and Order" knows polygraph results are typically inadmissible in court, so why should brain fingerprinting be any different?

Lots of people have been commenting that the Eye has been looking droopy lately. Well, it is feeling a bit sleep deprived. The main problem is getting comfortable — its eyelid is developing some middle-age spread so the pillow gets squished. The Eye winds up spending half the night rolling from one end of the pillow seeking the poofy side. You get the picture.

The Eye was seriously considering plastic surgery to remove the under-Eye baggage when it discovered the Better Back Store in Boulder has therapeutic pillows and mattresses that you can check out just like with a library card.

The Eye will be rolling over to the store on the corner of 30th and Walnut streets to check out a few slumber aids if it can manage to stay awake until the end of the day.

The Boulder County Business Hall of Fame˜s 12th annual induction luncheon at the Millennium Harvest House April 28 was a feast for the senses, especially the Eye.

Hall of Fame President Violet Aandres was a vision of loveliness in her appropriately violet outfit.
During his acceptance speech Bill Reynolds said if his wife, Jane, hadn˜t dressed him that day he˜d be wearing biking clothes rather than a suit and tie. But he hinted he was wearing bike shorts under the monkey suit. Kevin Thede and Ronda Leggett, owners of the Marketplace Bakery in Louisville, accepted their award in style. Leggett remarked that she was happy her loyal clientele hadn˜t succumbed to the low-carb diet fad because "what would life be like without dastardly donuts."

Speaking of food, the Millennium outdid itself with a fabulous lunch. No rubber chicken for Boulder County˜s business elite. The carnivores feasted on surf and turf while the vegetarians enjoyed a portabella, eggplant and roasted yellow pepper stack on a slab of polenta, all smothered in a red pepper coulis. The molten chocolate dessert was finger-lickin˜ good, too.

The Eye rolled on down to Haystack Mountain Goat Dairy in Niwot to sample some Chevre, feta and three aged cheeses, pet some Saanen and Nubian kids and learn of a second creamery just established in Longmont that will "spread" distribution to San Francisco, Texas, New Mexico, Kansas and Louisiana. Other markets under consideration are Chicago, Portland, Seattle, Austin, Washington, D.C. and Los Angeles.

The dairy is one of 50 farmstead cheese makers in the nation and was founded 13 years ago. Haystack cheeses are already available at nearly 80 Colorado restaurants. Cheeses are available for purchase at Whole Foods, Albertson˜s, City Market, Wild Oats, King Soopers, Vitamin Cottage and through independent retailers.

When the Eye arrived on the farm, it twinkled with joy upon seeing two babies born a mere 15 minutes prior. Umbilical cords were still attached. The Eye even got to pet the creatures with its generous lashes. The tour was entertaining and informative. Unfortunately, the lovely visit was all over in the blink of a É well, you know.

More cheesy news: Slow Food of Boulder is hosting an "American Cheese without the Cellophane" event featuring 40 cheeses from 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, May 23, at Haystack Mountain Goat Dairy, 5239 Niwot Road. The public is invited to taste goat˜s, cow˜s and sheep˜s milk cheeses from Haystack Mountain, Bingham Hill Cheese Co. and Mou Co Cheese Co. in Colorado, Cowgirl Creamery and Point Reyes Farmstead Cheese Co. in California and Carr Valley Cheese Co. in Wisconsin. Admission is $25 for members of Slow Food of Boulder or $30 for nonmembers. Contact Michele Wells (303) 417-0696 or e-mail Michele@haystackgoatcheese.com to taste the cheeses and tour the Haystack creamery.

Perhaps The Eye is just jealous of bipeds, so it˜s understandable this rolling orb is not too active in running sports. Regardless, recently retired Bronco wide receiver Ed McCaffrey was deemed the official starter of the 26th Bolder Boulder 10K Memorial Day race on Monday, May 31. In his official role, he will begin all 75 waves of the race, which begins at 7 a.m. More than 50,000 runners, walkers and wheelchair racers are expected to traverse the 6.2 mile course. At 7 a.m., the Eye will be closed.

The Eye has been scared to think in public since the Patriot Act came down the pike. With the advent of brain fingerprinting, however, it may give up thought altogether.

It seems that a few local businesspeople, including DaVinci Institute˜s Tom Frey, are forming a task force to establish Colorado as the world leader in brain fingerprinting.

Brain fingerprinting is a kind of next-generation polygraph, but instead of measuring blood pressure and sweat it measures brain waves.

The task force proposes using brain fingerprinting in cold cases and to reduce pre-trial prosecution costs, estimating it could save Colorado $30 million a year.

But…

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