ARCHIVED  July 1, 1996

Retail, office space planned for historic Windsor granary

WINDSOR – A Windsor couple plans to buy the town’s old granary complex and restore it with retail and office tenants.

If successful, the Windsor Granary would anchor the east end of downtown Main Street.

“We’d like to bring in a restaurant and pub and store front shops on the main level and have the upper be professional offices,´ said Carmen Stavely
who with husband Don has a contract on the property.

Closing is set for July 15. The Stavelys still are conducting due diligence on the property.

“We just got one report back and have a little bit of concern about the (condition of the) grain bins,” she said. “We need a little bit more information
before we see if it’s a go.”

The couple, both of whom work at Hewlett-Packard Co. in Greeley, intends to use the four-story brick office building and grain bins. A warehouse
and another brick building likely would give way to parking.

Additionally, a blue frame home on the property might be used by some community organizations that now operate out of the homes of Windsor
residents. The house is rumored to the one of the first, if not the first, home that was built in Windsor.

Stavely said current owner Richard Lillard of Denver has done a “tremendous job” clearing out rubbish and saving items of historic interest from the
granary.

The couple already has taken their ideas before Windsor officials because they need the property rezoned from multifamily to central business district.

“They seem agreeable to what we are trying to do,” Stavely said.

Asking price for the property is $425,000. The Stavelys figure renovations would run $1 million to $1.2 million.

“They seem like an upbeat couple that could pull it off,´ said Steve Smith of Re/Max Country Classic, the listing broker. He and colleague Barb Adler
are brokering the deal.

Smith said he has been working with potential users who are serious about wanting to locate their business in the granary.

Estes retailer enters Fort Collins

FORT COLLINS – The Satin Camisole, a 20-year-old provider of women’s lingerie, soon will open its first store outside of Estes Park.

Proprietor Nancy Johnson will open a shop in the newly restored Loomis Building in Old Town Square this August.

“Fort Collins is really growing,” Johnson said. “I decided there was a need for a high-end lingerie shop.”

Additionally, many of her Northern Colorado customers had been asking Johnson when she would open another store.

“I also wanted a more year-round business,” she said.

Sales in Fort Collins should help take up the slack of Estes Park’s winter season. The new store also will offer swim wear, exercise wear and men’s
lounge wear.

Johnson also was excited about being next to her new neighbors in the Loomis building.

Adjacent to her 1,000 square feet will be the Walnut Street Gallery.

Another new tenant in the historic building, restored by Veldman Morgan Commercial, is Timbuktu Station, a women’s clothing, gift and accessory
store.

Entering the Fort Collins market for the first time, chief executive officer John Seifert said his company has been eyeing the Fort Collins market for
about two years.

Its 2,000-square-foot space will open the end of this month.

Timbuktu Station has other stores in Boulder, Denver, Minnesota and Michigan.

David Veldman said the entire second floor of the building will be occupied by Front Range Internet Inc.

A third-floor tenant has not yet been signed.

Acquisition and renovation of the Loomis Building cost approximately $1.8 million, Veldman said.

The Loomis Building was constructed just before the turn of the century and initially was used as a hardware store and later as a furniture and carpet
emporium. For the last 15 years, though, it has stood mostly idle and vacant.

The city of Fort Collins, in an effort to retain historical structures in the Old Town area, committed more than $1 million toward the facade restoration
of both the Loomis Building and historic Linden Building and to streetscape improvements.

Veldman Morgan also restored the Linden. Sinnett Builders Inc. and Vaught *Frye were the general contractor and architects, respectively, for the
projects.

Frederick park attracts tenants

FREDERICK – A new contracting supply business, G & S Contractors Supply, has completed construction of an $800,000, 14,700-square-foot
building in Indian Peaks Industrial Park along Interstate 25.

Gus and Sharon Robson of Weld County own the business, along with a resort-building business that works primarily in the Caribbean basin.

“We started the business because we would have to go all the way to Denver all the time for supplies,” Gus Robson said. “We will carry a complete
tool line – every tool for the contracting business as well as masonry and cement lines.”

The Robsons assembled a fleet of five trucks that will deliver equipment and supplies.

A variety of ornamental precast, stucco (traditional and synthetic) and tiles also will be stocked.

Robson does high-end tile work, pools and other decorative finishes for primarily Dutch contractors in the Caribbean islands. During the off season,
the company builds pools and does other work for estate homes in the region.

The new supply company will occupy almost half of the Frederick building. EMC Integrity, a magnetic testing company from Longmont, is leasing
about 2,400 square feet. The remainder of the building also will be leased.

“Frederick was open to helping us and to growth,” Robson said. “They were a pleasure to work with. And Weld County had the enterprise-zone
advantage.”

Fagre Construction of Boulder was general contractor for the building.

Greeley bank changing locations

GREELEY – First Northern Savings Bank of Greeley this month will move to a new building at the northwest corner of 35th Avenue and 12th Street.

The approximately 5,300-square-foot building, owned by West and Sue Foster of Greeley, will replace the bank’s current location at 924 11th St.

“We will occupy over 3,300 square feet,´ said Roger Plock, branch manager of the locally-owned bank. “We will have a better, bigger drive-up and a
drive-up ATM, as well as a bigger teller line.”

At least one new full-time employee will be hired, and part-time staff could be added as banking hours are likely to be extended.

The remainder of the new building will be sublet by First Northern, which has a long-term lease on the facility.

Sue Foster said the building and land cost slightly less than $1 million.

First Northern had to vacate its 11th Street address because building owner Joel Rothman and others are launching the new Cache Bank, which will
be in the downtown Greeley building.

WINDSOR – A Windsor couple plans to buy the town’s old granary complex and restore it with retail and office tenants.

If successful, the Windsor Granary would anchor the east end of downtown Main Street.

“We’d like to bring in a restaurant and pub and store front shops on the main level and have the upper be professional offices,´ said Carmen Stavely
who with husband Don has a contract on the property.

Closing is set for July 15. The Stavelys still are conducting due diligence on the property.

“We just got one report back and have a little bit of…

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