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 February 1, 1996

Newcomers to area should just go away

Dear editor,

The argument that “If we build it they will come” is so bogus that, if it weren’t such a serious matter it would be laughable. [Who needs Timberline extension, January issue].

The southern part of our state is littered with thousands of empty lots, deserted streets, and bankrupt developers, because someone bought into thisvacuous theory. For that matter look at our mountain ghost towns: Empty buildings, crumbled foundations, broken memories. Nice place to live. Noplace to work. Professorial hypothecating to the contrary, it just doesn’t hold water. Witness the present day dilemma of TempeScottsdalePhoenix. Thirty years ago
well-intentioned polticians determined that the way to keep people from moving into their own private version of Camelot was to restrict needed
arterial highway building. A mistake. Because of this, those communities are now in a billion dollar highway building program that is expensive,
disruptive to neighborhoods, and too late. That once pristine valley is one of the most polluted areas in the United States. After eight years of
off-and-on living down there, I gave up. You need to understand that I would cheerfully support an ordinance that would require anyone who arrived in Northern Colorado after October 14,
1955 to pack up and leave. Or at least have a green card. This was a great place before all you other guys showed up. In the meantime, let’s get real:
People come to a community because of the availability of employment coupled with the fact it is a nice place to live. Not because someone had the
foresight to build needed infrastructure. Very truly yours, Larry E. Scott Loveland Slanted story had error Dear editor, I read with interest (personal) your article in the “Loveland/Berthoud” special entitled “Berthoud Wrangles with Growth” by Kyle Koso. Aside from
the usual agenda slant toward no growth, he was dead wrong about the ownership of Berthoud Village. Sitzman Mitchell Company only owns 30
percent of B.V., not all of it. The remainder of the ownership is local. Check it out. Dr. Jeanie Bein 6988 Ammons St. Arvada Web page sparks question (Editor’s note: The following exchange occurred on the Internet. It is reproduced with the approval of the originator.) Dear editor, I just finished reading you most current Internet page [the Business Report’s new World Wide Web page at http://ncbr.com] and am wondering what
your schedule is for new postings. How does one submit articles or information? How often will you update? I think the concept is valuable if kept current; otherwise it is nothing but a rehash of what most business people read in all of the new business
journals. Keep up the great idea, and best of luck. James O. Skellett (via e-mail) Editor’s response: “Our web page will be updated monthly. It’s unfeasible for us to update it on a weekly or daily basis at this time. Right now, it’s
intended to help us reach readers who might not otherwise have access to our newspaper, or who simply want to read us via a different medium. We
expect people to access our Web page nationwide. You’d be surprised at the interest in this community from individuals and businesses across the
country. If you’ve already read our newspaper, then, yes, the Web page content will be identical, at least for now. Its content will be what you read in our
latest issue, but back issues also will be available. For example, our January issue soon will be posted, but December will still be there as well. We’ll also be posting subscription and advertising information and will be adding linkages to area business organizations. As we grow, our web page
will grow. Thanks for your interest, and keep the feedback coming. James O. Skellett: Thank you for your prompt response. I am excited that you [see] a large interest in our region from other Internet users across the
U.S. & the world. Fort Collins and Larimer County is one the most exciting regions to grow a business in and enjoy a high quality of life and family.
I do enjoy your publication and wish you continued success. Where’s foreclosure data? Dear editor, I saw your Web page address in your paper. The advertisement said that foreclosure and bankruptcy information is here somewhere, but I have been unable to find it. Could you tell me where to look? Maybe it hasn’t been put on yet? Geoff Miller (via e-mail) Editor’s response: Thanks for your comments. The bankruptcty and foreclosure information is in the Business Databank heading under “Columns.”

Dear editor,

The argument that “If we build it they will come” is so bogus that, if it weren’t such a serious matter it would be laughable. [Who needs Timberline extension, January issue].

The southern part of our state is littered with thousands of empty lots, deserted streets, and bankrupt developers, because someone bought into thisvacuous theory. For that matter look at our mountain ghost towns: Empty buildings, crumbled foundations, broken memories. Nice place to live. Noplace to work. Professorial hypothecating to the contrary, it just doesn’t hold water. Witness the present day dilemma of TempeScottsdalePhoenix. Thirty years ago
well-intentioned polticians…

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