Greeley City Council authorizes eminent domain for Terry Ranch pipeline

GREELEY — The Greeley City Council voted unanimously Tuesday night to authorize the use of eminent domain to acquire land for the Terry Ranch water-supply project. 

The city acquired the Terry Ranch aquifer, near the Colorado/Wyoming border, in March with the intention to mine the aquifer for water it can treat for current use and to install pumps so it can store water below the surface. The project would add 1.2 million acre-feet of water to Greeley’s supply, enough to fulfill the city’s current water usage for 48 years.

The project entails the construction of storage tanks, wells, a treatment plant, power facilities and 30 miles of pipeline to carry water from the aquifer to Greeley’s existing water-transmission line, which is located north of Windsor. The pipeline has a 60-foot easement. 

Greeley plans to build the pipeline in phases, with work on the southernmost six miles starting this year. City water and sewer director Sean Chambers said the city has already begun negotiating with affected landowners in the path of the pipeline. 

The city is required by law to negotiate in good faith with landowners before acquiring property through eminent domain. If the parties can’t reach an agreement, there will be a public hearing to determine whether use of the property is necessary for the project. Then, if the hearing ends in the city’s favor, it can begin using the land immediately while appraisers for both parties determine how much the property owner will be compensated. 

The first six-mile stretch of pipeline is expected to be completed by 2025, with the remaining 24 miles constructed by 2035. 

No members of the public spoke about this issue at the meeting.

GREELEY — The Greeley City Council voted unanimously Tuesday night to authorize the use of eminent domain to acquire land for the Terry Ranch water-supply project. 

The city acquired the Terry Ranch aquifer, near the Colorado/Wyoming border, in March with the intention to mine the aquifer for water it can treat for current use and to install pumps so it can store water below the surface. The project would add 1.2 million acre-feet of water to Greeley’s supply, enough to fulfill the city’s current water usage for 48 years.

The project entails the construction of storage tanks, wells, a treatment plant, power facilities and 30 miles of pipeline to carry water from the aquifer to Greeley’s existing water-transmission line, which is located north of Windsor. The pipeline has a 60-foot easement. 

Greeley plans to build the pipeline in phases, with work on the southernmost six miles starting this year. City water and sewer director Sean Chambers said the city has already begun negotiating with affected landowners in the path of the pipeline. 

The city is required by law to negotiate in good faith with landowners before acquiring property through eminent domain. If the parties can’t reach an agreement, there will be a public hearing to determine whether use of the property is necessary for the project. Then, if the hearing ends in the city’s favor, it can begin using the land immediately while appraisers for both parties determine how much the property owner will be compensated. 

The first six-mile stretch of pipeline is expected to…