Innosphere re-ups with diabetic ulcer gel developer

FORT COLLINS — Innosphere Ventures Fund bought in again on GelSana Therapeutics Inc. An earlier backing funded product development for the start-up’s therapeutic gels.

Healing gel in action; new investment to pay for FDA application prep. Courtesy GelSana Therapeutics Inc.

This second seed-stage buy-in will accelerate research work, prepare a U.S. Food & Drug Administration submission and begin to build a pipeline of products.

GelSana’s hydrogels aim to improve healing of diabetic ulcers and other wounds: closing cuts and sores faster, growing stronger skin and enabling controlled delivery of healing therapies.

A product prototype was aimed at diabetic foot ulcers but “we believe the unique properties of GelSana’s hydrogels may have much larger applicability in wound healing,” founder and CEO Melissa Krebs said.

The technology is licensed from Colorado School of Mines in Golden, where Krebs is associate professor of chemical and biological engineering.

Secretary of State filings show GelSana this year has moved offices from the School of Mines to a house in Englewood connected to Krebs in late August, a site about a 10-minute walk from the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora.

GelSana is both a portfolio company of the Innosphere fund and a client in its bioscience and technology accelerator in Fort Collins, a press release about the investment said.

© BizWestMedia LLC

FORT COLLINS — Innosphere Ventures Fund bought in again on GelSana Therapeutics Inc. An earlier backing funded product development for the start-up’s therapeutic gels.

Healing gel in action; new investment to pay for FDA application prep. Courtesy GelSana Therapeutics Inc.

This second seed-stage buy-in will accelerate research work, prepare a U.S. Food & Drug Administration submission and begin to build a pipeline of products.

GelSana’s hydrogels aim to improve healing of diabetic ulcers and other wounds: closing cuts and sores faster, growing stronger skin and enabling controlled delivery of healing therapies.

A product prototype was aimed at diabetic foot ulcers but “we believe the unique properties of GelSana’s hydrogels may have much larger applicability in wound healing,” founder and CEO Melissa Krebs said.

The technology is licensed from Colorado School of Mines in Golden, where Krebs is associate professor of chemical and biological engineering.

Secretary of State filings show GelSana this year has moved offices from the School of Mines to a house in Englewood connected to Krebs in late August, a site about a 10-minute walk from the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora.

GelSana is both a portfolio company of the Innosphere fund and a client in its bioscience and technology accelerator in Fort Collins, a press release about the investment said.

© BizWestMedia LLC