Crocs files complaint to block knockoff clog sales

BROOMFIELD — Crocs Inc. (Nasdaq: CROX) is asking the U.S. International Trade Commission to investigate knockoff products imported to the U.S. in violation of copyright laws.

“We pride ourselves in creating iconic products that are distinctly Crocs and this decisive action further demonstrates our commitment to protecting our brand, our trademarks and other intellectual property,” Crocs CEO Andrew Rees said in a prepared statement. “By blocking the importation and sale of trademark-infringing footwear, we can ensure with confidence that our product DNA is fully protected while continuing to provide an authentically Crocs experience to our customers and consumers.”

The complaint to the ITC “seeks to block the importation and subsequent sale of products into the United States that infringe on its trademark rights,” Crocs said. A ruling in the company’s favor would “apply to any importer of infringing products and protect the Crocs brand from those who seek to unfairly trade off of Crocs’ success, in perpetuity.”Crocs has long battled would-be knockoff artists and in 2006, the ITC issued an order barring the importation of goods that infringe on company patents. The current complaint is similar, but relates to trademarks rather than patents.

BROOMFIELD — Crocs Inc. (Nasdaq: CROX) is asking the U.S. International Trade Commission to investigate knockoff products imported to the U.S. in violation of copyright laws.

“We pride ourselves in creating iconic products that are distinctly Crocs and this decisive action further demonstrates our commitment to protecting our brand, our trademarks and other intellectual property,” Crocs CEO Andrew Rees said in a prepared statement. “By blocking the importation and sale of trademark-infringing footwear, we can ensure with confidence that our product DNA is fully protected while continuing to provide an authentically Crocs experience to our customers and consumers.”

The complaint to the ITC “seeks to block the importation and subsequent sale of products into the United States that infringe on its trademark rights,” Crocs said. A ruling in the company’s favor would “apply to any importer of infringing products and protect the Crocs brand from those who seek to unfairly trade off of Crocs’ success, in perpetuity.”Crocs has long battled would-be knockoff artists and in 2006, the ITC issued an order barring the importation of goods that infringe on company patents. The current complaint is similar, but relates to trademarks rather than patents.