New Mexico-based crop health startup adds Fort Collins office

FORT COLLINS — Innate Immunity LLC, a fruit health startup, has moved its research offices to Fort Collins’ Innosphere accelerator.

Co-founder Michelle Miller told BizWest that the company will remain headquartered out of the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico but wanted to move its main research hub to be closer to Colorado State University where it already has a research grant.

She also said Fort Collins has a larger pool of potential employees and researchers focused on preventing and treating plant diseases in grape, citrus, apple and pear plants, which are the company’s targets.

“New Mexico is a great place, but it’s not necessarily a big crop-ag state,” she said. “There is some of it, but the types of crops that we’re focused on are not grown there,” she said.

Miller said the company’s products, which are topical sprays meant to help plants fight infections such as Pierce’s Disease for grapevines, are currently undergoing field trials in Florida, California and orchards across the country. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has oversight as to whether the products, which are classified as biopesticides, can go to market.

Some of Innate Immunity’s staff have already relocated to Fort Collins and begun construction on lab space within Innosphere’s building on the city’s north side. The company plans to continue build-out through the end of 2021 depending on availability of supplies and will house between 15 and 20 employees, she said.

© 2020 BizWest Media LLC

FORT COLLINS — Innate Immunity LLC, a fruit health startup, has moved its research offices to Fort Collins’ Innosphere accelerator.

Co-founder Michelle Miller told BizWest that the company will remain headquartered out of the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico but wanted to move its main research hub to be closer to Colorado State University where it already has a research grant.

She also said Fort Collins has a larger pool of potential employees and researchers focused on preventing and treating plant diseases in grape, citrus, apple and pear plants, which are the company’s targets.

“New Mexico is a great place, but it’s not necessarily a big crop-ag state,” she said. “There is some of it, but the types of crops that we’re focused on are not grown there,” she said.

Miller said the company’s products, which are topical sprays meant to help plants fight infections such as Pierce’s Disease for grapevines, are currently undergoing field trials in Florida, California and orchards across the country. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has oversight as to whether the products, which are classified as biopesticides, can go to market.

Some of Innate Immunity’s staff have already relocated to Fort Collins and begun construction on lab space within Innosphere’s building on the city’s north side. The company plans to continue build-out through the end of 2021 depending on availability of supplies and will house between 15 and 20 employees, she said.

© 2020 BizWest Media LLC