Boulder deputy city manager accepts position in Oregon

BOULDER — Boulder deputy city manager Tanya Ange has accepted a position as county administrator with Washington County, Oregon, a council-manager government with a budget of $1.4 billion and a population of about 600,000 directly west of Portland. Her last day will be Aug. 3.

Ange has been with Boulder for four years.

Tanya Ange

“I have completely enjoyed my time as deputy city manager in Boulder and have learned so much from colleagues and this community,” Ange said in a written statement. “I look forward to applying my positive experience here to this new leadership role, especially when it comes to creating cultures of continuous learning, employee empowerment, racial equity and meaningful connections between local government and the communities we serve.”

“I have mixed emotions of sadness and joy as I see Tanya move to the next level of her career, but mostly what I feel is gratitude and pride,” city manager Jane Brautigam said. “…She models a commitment to all community members and respect for inclusivity and equity that I believe are essential for our next generation of public servants. Washington County will be in good hands.”

Brautigam said Ange’s position will remain  vacant through the end of 2020 in light of current economic challenges, and will assess the needs of the city before deciding whether to fill it.

BOULDER — Boulder deputy city manager Tanya Ange has accepted a position as county administrator with Washington County, Oregon, a council-manager government with a budget of $1.4 billion and a population of about 600,000 directly west of Portland. Her last day will be Aug. 3.

Ange has been with Boulder for four years.

Tanya Ange

“I have completely enjoyed my time as deputy city manager in Boulder and have learned so much from colleagues and this community,” Ange said in a written statement. “I look forward to applying my positive experience here to this new leadership role, especially when it comes to creating cultures of continuous learning, employee empowerment, racial equity and meaningful connections between local government and the communities we serve.”

“I have mixed emotions of sadness and joy as I see Tanya move to the next level of her career, but mostly what I feel is gratitude and pride,” city manager Jane Brautigam said. “…She models a commitment to all community members and respect for inclusivity and equity that I believe are essential for our next generation of public servants. Washington County will be in good hands.”

Brautigam said Ange’s position will remain  vacant through the end of 2020 in light of current economic challenges, and will assess the needs of the city before deciding whether to fill it.