Elder Construction denies Honeywell’s accusations of lab construction defects

BROOMFIELD — Elder Construction Inc. is asking a federal court to dismiss a lawsuit from Honeywell International Inc. (NYSE: HON) over alleged climate-control defects in the manufacturing conglomerate’s research office in Broomfield.

In filings with the U.S. District Court of Colorado Friday, the Windsor contractor said that while Honeywell did have complaints about certain parts of its work for three rooms in Honeywell’s research facility at 303 S. Technology Court, none of those complaints came from a direct result of Elder’s work.

Elder also accused Honeywell of breaching the construction contract and causing damages through its own actions or failure to act, but didn’t specifically say how it believes Honeywell broke the agreement.

Honeywell first sued Elder in late November, claiming that Elder failed to construct a climate-control system that would keep certain research rooms at near-exactly 70 degrees and 40 percent humidity after the two parties signed a contract in 2016. Honeywell is asking the court to force Elder to pay just under $3 million to cover the costs of Honeywell hiring another firm to redesign the air-conditioning system.

In a statement, Elder Construction Chief Operating Officer Austin Dodder said the company could not comment further about its allegations against Honeywell due to non-disclosure agreements, but plans to continue working towards a resolution.

Honeywell did not respond to a request for additional comment Monday morning.

BROOMFIELD — Elder Construction Inc. is asking a federal court to dismiss a lawsuit from Honeywell International Inc. (NYSE: HON) over alleged climate-control defects in the manufacturing conglomerate’s research office in Broomfield.

In filings with the U.S. District Court of Colorado Friday, the Windsor contractor said that while Honeywell did have complaints about certain parts of its work for three rooms in Honeywell’s research facility at 303 S. Technology Court, none of those complaints came from a direct result of Elder’s work.

Elder also accused Honeywell of breaching the construction contract and causing damages through its own actions or failure to act, but didn’t specifically say how it believes Honeywell broke the agreement.

Honeywell first sued Elder in late November, claiming that Elder failed to construct a climate-control system that would keep certain research rooms at near-exactly 70 degrees and 40 percent humidity after the two parties signed a contract in 2016. Honeywell is asking the court to force Elder to pay just under $3 million to cover the costs of Honeywell hiring another firm to redesign the air-conditioning system.

In a statement, Elder Construction Chief Operating Officer Austin Dodder said the company could not comment further about its allegations against Honeywell due to non-disclosure agreements, but plans to continue working towards a resolution.

Honeywell did not respond to a request for additional comment Monday morning.