State proposal could give thousands of employees overtime pay

DENVER — The Colorado Department of Labor and Employment has released its proposal for expanding overtime protections to potentially thousands of low and middle-wage employees across the state.

The draft, released Monday, would grant non-executive salaried employees overtime pay if they make below $42,000 in 2020. Starting in 2021, that threshold for overtime pay would increase by $3,000 annually before reaching a cap of $57,500 in 2026 before being readjusted in following years for inflation.

The rules also make changes to eligibility and exempt status depending on an employee’s line of work or if they happen to be a co-owner of a startup.

A public hearing on the rule is scheduled for December 16, and the department is taking public comment until New Year’s Eve. The final rule could be adopted as soon as Jan. 10 next year, and take effect next March.

DENVER — The Colorado Department of Labor and Employment has released its proposal for expanding overtime protections to potentially thousands of low and middle-wage employees across the state.

The draft, released Monday, would grant non-executive salaried employees overtime pay if they make below $42,000 in 2020. Starting in 2021, that threshold for overtime pay would increase by $3,000 annually before reaching a cap of $57,500 in 2026 before being readjusted in following years for inflation.

The rules also make changes to eligibility and exempt status depending on an employee’s line of work or if they happen to be a co-owner of a startup.

A public hearing on the rule is scheduled for December 16, and the department is taking public comment until New Year’s Eve. The final rule could be adopted as soon as Jan. 10 next year, and take effect next March.