Northern Water sets water quota at 70 percent

BERTHOUD – The Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District, headquartered in Berthoud, has set the 2019 water quota at 70 percent.

Above average regional water storage coupled with above average snowpack prompted the Northern Water board to increase its quota allocation for the Colorado-Big Thompson Project, the agency said in a prepared statement.

Luke Shawcross, manager of the Water Resources Department at Northern Water, outlined snowpack and forecasted streamflows and discussed the impact of last week’s storm on water supplies.

“On a district-wide basis we are generally out of drought conditions and streamflow forecasts indicate average to above average flows,” said Shawcross.  

When setting the quota the board considers current regional reservoir storage levels, forecasted snowpack runoff, availability of water within the C-BT system and public input.

At Northern Water’s Spring Water Users meeting held April 9, the largest number of water users in attendance preferred a C-BT quota of 70 percent.

“We need to focus on what our allottees need. It’s pretty clear the water is available,” said Larimer County board member Bill Emslie.

The board has been setting C-BT quota since 1957 and a 70 percent quota is the most common annual allocation during that period.

“It’s an average year and a 70 percent quota is justified,” said Mike Applegate, board president.

The quota increases available C-BT Project water supplies by 62,000 acre-feet from the initial 50 percent quota made available in November.

Water from the C-BT Project supplements other sources for 33 cities and towns, 120 agricultural irrigation companies, various industries and other water users within Northern Water’s 1.6 million-acre service area. According to recent census figures, approximately 980,000 residents now live inside Northern Water’s boundaries.

 

BERTHOUD – The Northern Colorado Water Conservancy District, headquartered in Berthoud, has set the 2019 water quota at 70 percent.

Above average regional water storage coupled with above average snowpack prompted the Northern Water board to increase its quota allocation for the Colorado-Big Thompson Project, the agency said in a prepared statement.

Luke Shawcross, manager of the Water Resources Department at Northern Water, outlined snowpack and forecasted streamflows and discussed the impact of last week’s storm on water supplies.

“On a district-wide basis we are generally out of drought conditions and streamflow forecasts indicate average to above average flows,” said Shawcross.  

When setting the quota the board considers current regional reservoir storage levels, forecasted snowpack runoff, availability of water within the C-BT system and public input.

At Northern Water’s Spring Water Users meeting held April 9, the largest number of water users in attendance preferred a C-BT quota of 70 percent.

“We need to focus on what our allottees need. It’s pretty clear the water is available,” said Larimer County board member Bill Emslie.

The board has been setting C-BT quota since 1957 and a 70 percent quota is the most common annual allocation during that period.

“It’s an average year and a 70 percent quota is justified,” said Mike Applegate, board president.

The quota increases available C-BT Project water supplies by 62,000 acre-feet from the initial 50 percent quota made available in November.

Water from the C-BT Project supplements other sources for 33 cities and towns, 120 agricultural irrigation companies, various industries and other water…