Array gets national recommendation for use of its drug combination

BOULDER — The National Comprehensive Cancer Network has updated its clinical practice guidelines for colon and rectal cancer that includes a drug combination from Array BioPharma Inc. (Nasdaq: ARRY).

The update includes Braftovi in combination with Mektovi and an anti-EGFR antibody as a treatment for patients with BRAF-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer, after the failure of one or two prior lines of therapy for metastatic disease, Array said in a news release. The BRAF mutation usually has a poor prognosis compared to patients with colorectal cancer who do not have the mutation. There are currently no FDA therapies that are specific for this unmet need population.

“With no current FDA-approved therapies for BRAF [colorectal cancer], this combination represents an important treatment option for this patient population,” Scott Kopetz, associate professor for the department of gastrointestinal medical oncology in the division of cancer medicine at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, said in a prepared statement.

He added that the National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommending this treatment underscores the potential for the triplet combination to help patients in need.

The recommendation is based on data from a clinical trial that tested the triple combination.

 

BOULDER — The National Comprehensive Cancer Network has updated its clinical practice guidelines for colon and rectal cancer that includes a drug combination from Array BioPharma Inc. (Nasdaq: ARRY).

The update includes Braftovi in combination with Mektovi and an anti-EGFR antibody as a treatment for patients with BRAF-mutant metastatic colorectal cancer, after the failure of one or two prior lines of therapy for metastatic disease, Array said in a news release. The BRAF mutation usually has a poor prognosis compared to patients with colorectal cancer who do not have the mutation. There are currently no FDA therapies that are specific for this unmet need population.

“With no current FDA-approved therapies for BRAF [colorectal cancer], this combination represents an important treatment option for this patient population,” Scott Kopetz, associate professor for the department of gastrointestinal medical oncology in the division of cancer medicine at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, said in a prepared statement.

He added that the National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommending this treatment underscores the potential for the triplet combination to help patients in need.

The recommendation is based on data from a clinical trial that tested the triple combination.