Double Helix Optics raises $1.4 million in capital

BOULDER — Double Helix Optics Inc., which specializes in 3D imaging, has raised $1.4 million in capital.

The Boulder-based company uses Nobel-prize winning technology, called super resolution imaging, and combines that with 3D to enable high-precision extended depth imaging, CEO and co-founder Leslie Kimerling told BizWest. Super-resolution imaging won the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 2014. It found a way to capture the image of very, very small items — particles and molecules and proteins — without it being too blurry to see clearly.

Co-founder and chief innovation officer Rafael Piestun, a professor at CU Boulder, took that technology and found ways to extend it to the third dimension. That capability is what Double Helix Optics is now applying as a product that can be used to three-dimensionally image down to the protein and molecular level. The goal is for industries like life sciences and material sciences to get the high-quality imaging they need.

“We enable studying structures down to individual molecules inside the cell. If you want to do disease discovery and drug development and understand the methods of action, you need to see how proteins interact and morph,” Kimerling said. “That’s something scientists were not able to do before our tech and some others in the family of our tech. And we are one of the ones who do it best, because we can do it in the third dimension.”

Kimerling said the capital will be used for growing its market, but also for continued research and development. Double Helix is looking to target its technology for other uses, such as for inspections and robotics. In addition to the $1.4 million raised through equity offerings, Double Helix has also received $2 million in grant money.

 

BOULDER — Double Helix Optics Inc., which specializes in 3D imaging, has raised $1.4 million in capital.

The Boulder-based company uses Nobel-prize winning technology, called super resolution imaging, and combines that with 3D to enable high-precision extended depth imaging, CEO and co-founder Leslie Kimerling told BizWest. Super-resolution imaging won the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 2014. It found a way to capture the image of very, very small items — particles and molecules and proteins — without it being too blurry to see clearly.

Co-founder and chief innovation officer Rafael Piestun, a professor at CU Boulder, took that technology and found ways to extend it to the third dimension. That capability is what Double Helix Optics is now applying as a product that can be used to three-dimensionally image down to the protein and molecular level. The goal is for industries like life sciences and material sciences to get the high-quality imaging they need.

“We enable studying structures down to individual molecules inside the cell. If you want to do disease discovery and drug development and understand the methods of action, you need to see how proteins interact and morph,” Kimerling said. “That’s something scientists were not able to do before our tech and some others in the family of our tech. And we are one of the ones who do it best, because we can do it in the third dimension.”

Kimerling said the capital will be used for growing its market, but also for continued research and development.…