ELECTION: Amendment 73, a tax for education, fails

Amendment 73, which would have stabilized property-tax rates for school districts and provided funding for pre-Kindergarten and full-day Kindergarten across the state, has been defeated, with 55 percent of voters against the measure.

The race has been called against Amendment 73, with 1,045,222 votes against and 839,043 votes in favor, according to the Colorado Secretary of State. All 64 counties have reported. 

Amendment 73 also would have expanded the definition of students at risk and increased funding for programs that serve children with special needs, gifted and talented students, and English language learners. Supporters of the amendment said it would have raised $1.6 billion annually for public schools.

“Colorado needs to decide what kind of state it wants to be. Our state cannot continue to grow and maintain a robust economy without more investment in our education system,” Amie Baca-Oehlert, a high school counselor and president of the Colorado Education Association, said in a prepared statement. “TABOR has a stranglehold on Colorado’s ability to deliver the schools our students deserve and that employers need for future growth. Coloradans need to come together to solve the problem of TABOR revenue restrictions for this state to make critical investments in our kids and their future.”

Critics of the measure were critical of the fact that it was a constitutional amendment, saying that it would have built inflexibility into the constitution.

 

Amendment 73, which would have stabilized property-tax rates for school districts and provided funding for pre-Kindergarten and full-day Kindergarten across the state, has been defeated, with 55 percent of voters against the measure.

The race has been called against Amendment 73, with 1,045,222 votes against and 839,043 votes in favor, according to the Colorado Secretary of State. All 64 counties have reported. 

Amendment 73 also would have expanded the definition of students at risk and increased funding for programs that serve children with special needs, gifted and talented students, and English language learners. Supporters of the amendment said it would have raised $1.6 billion annually for public schools.

“Colorado needs to decide what kind of state it wants to be. Our state cannot continue to grow and maintain a robust economy without more investment in our education system,” Amie Baca-Oehlert, a high school counselor and president of the Colorado Education Association, said in a prepared statement. “TABOR has a stranglehold on Colorado’s ability to deliver the schools our students deserve and that employers need for future growth. Coloradans need to come together to solve the problem of TABOR revenue restrictions for this state to make critical investments in our kids and their future.”

Critics of the measure were critical of the fact that it was a constitutional amendment, saying that it would have built inflexibility into the constitution.