KromaTiD lands grant to advance gene-analysis technology

FORT COLLINS — KromaTiD Inc. in Fort Collins has been awarded a Fast-Track Small Business Innovation Research grant by the National Human Genome Research Institute.

The grant, just shy of $1 million, will fund KromaTiD’s development of an automated platform capable of measuring complex structural variations in human genes.

KromaTiD currently has a manually operated system of analyzing genes. With that platform, KromaTiD provides commercial assays for detection of cancer-causing genes, discovery of disease-causing variants, measure biological responses to radiation, and measure structural off-target effects caused by gene-editing.

“Through this SBIR award, the NIH is making it possible for KromaTiD to provide economical, whole genome analysis in thousands of single cells per sample — enabling the discovery of rare structural variants and the measurement of extremely low levels of off-target structural damage in batches of edited cells,” KromaTiD’s president and chief technology officer, Christopher Tompkins, said in a prepared statement.

Dave Sebesta, KromaTiD’s chief commercial officer, said the company is growing its commercial sales and is looking for new space to accommodate the growth. The company has 12 full-time employees in Fort Collins and also has several contract employees who contribute remotely.  

 

FORT COLLINS — KromaTiD Inc. in Fort Collins has been awarded a Fast-Track Small Business Innovation Research grant by the National Human Genome Research Institute.

The grant, just shy of $1 million, will fund KromaTiD’s development of an automated platform capable of measuring complex structural variations in human genes.

KromaTiD currently has a manually operated system of analyzing genes. With that platform, KromaTiD provides commercial assays for detection of cancer-causing genes, discovery of disease-causing variants, measure biological responses to radiation, and measure structural off-target effects caused by gene-editing.

“Through this SBIR award, the NIH is making it possible for KromaTiD to provide economical, whole genome analysis in thousands of single cells per sample — enabling the discovery of rare structural variants and the measurement of extremely low levels of off-target structural damage in batches of edited cells,” KromaTiD’s president and chief technology officer, Christopher Tompkins, said in a prepared statement.

Dave Sebesta, KromaTiD’s chief commercial officer, said the company is growing its commercial sales and is looking for new space to accommodate the growth. The company has 12 full-time employees in Fort Collins and also has several contract employees who contribute remotely.