Peak Serum expands to larger facility in Wellington

WELLINGTON — Peak Serum, a supplier of fetal bovine serum to bioscience researchers, has moved it operations from Fort Collins to a larger location in Wellington.

Peak Serum, led by president Tom Kutrubes, has moved to a 3,000-square-foot building at 6598 Buttercup Drive in the Wellington Business Center. The facility will allow Peak Serum to maximize efficiency and product flow, Kutrubes said.

The facility will have a temperature-monitored cold-storage unit with the capacity to store 12,000 liters of serum. The new plant also features energy-saving systems and equipment.

Peak Serum contracts with third-parties to extract and process the serum. The serum will be shipped to Wellington where it will be stored before being distributed to Peak Serum’s clients.

Biotech researchers use fetal bovine serum because its variety of proteins maintain cultured cells in a medium in which they can survive, grow and divide.

“Researchers’ focus should be on their work, not worrying about reliably securing the media they need to perform,” Kutrubes said. “Our move to a new location allows us to continue to provide FBS to research facilities across the country.”

Peak Serum sells 500 milliliters of the serum for about $450, according to its website.

 

WELLINGTON — Peak Serum, a supplier of fetal bovine serum to bioscience researchers, has moved it operations from Fort Collins to a larger location in Wellington.

Peak Serum, led by president Tom Kutrubes, has moved to a 3,000-square-foot building at 6598 Buttercup Drive in the Wellington Business Center. The facility will allow Peak Serum to maximize efficiency and product flow, Kutrubes said.

The facility will have a temperature-monitored cold-storage unit with the capacity to store 12,000 liters of serum. The new plant also features energy-saving systems and equipment.

Peak Serum contracts with third-parties to extract and process the serum. The serum will be shipped to Wellington where it will be stored before being distributed to Peak Serum’s clients.

Biotech researchers use fetal bovine serum because its variety of proteins maintain cultured cells in a medium in which they can survive, grow and divide.

“Researchers’ focus should be on their work, not worrying about reliably securing the media they need to perform,” Kutrubes said. “Our move to a new location allows us to continue to provide FBS to research facilities across the country.”

Peak Serum sells 500 milliliters of the serum for about $450, according to its website.