EnergyLogic rides wave of green building awareness

EnergyLogic Inc. principal Steve Byers saw earlier than most the growing need for sustainable practices.

In 1992, upon completing his service to the U.S. Air Force, Byers became an intern at Georgia-based Southface Energy Institute. The non-profit focuses on providing environmental education and outreach. Byers’ time at Southface gave him the experience and tools he needed to start his own venture.

Byers’ wife, Wynne Maggi, is a Berthoud native, so the couple decided to settle back into the small Northern Colorado town to start EnergySmiths, an energy rating firm with a focus on consulting with homebuilders in the region, in 2001.

The business grew quickly, riding a tidal wave of new residential construction along the Front Range. EnergyLogic provides consultation on methods and tools for reducing energy consumption and overall environmental impact. The company’s revenues more than doubled in three years, with almost $890,000 in 2006.

Byers found that there was a familiar face appearing at many of the bids he was trying to land for EnergySmith. Robby Schwartz owned Denver-based energy ratings firm BuiltWright Inc. The two decided that it was in the best interest for the companies to join forces and in January 2006 the two merged to become EnergyLogic.

Today, the company operates three offices and employs 20 people. However, growth going forward is likely to be more measured and deliberate. The housing market has definitely cooled, slowing the growth of EnergyLogic’s core business.

“It’s definitely dropped off, but we are continuing to grow,” Byers said.

EnergyLogic, the 2007 Bravo! Emerging Entrepreneur, is truly a rising star. The company is preparing to launch several new business ventures that put it beyond the  scope of consultant to residential home builders.

The company vision of “a future in which all homes have the least possible impact on the Earth” may need some adjustment as it offers its expertise to a new clientele.

“We are trying to form a commercial division,” Byers said.

The company is also looking to expand its reach into the existing home market. As Byers put it, there are a lot more existing homes than new ones. The growth into these new markets means dealing with different customers, but that is not a deterrent. Maggi describes herself and Byers as risk-takers, and Byers said that not all of the company’s ventures have panned out.

“We tried a remote office, and it went badly,” Byers said. The “try-and-fail” approach has been a great tool for EnergyLogic, so much so that the company is growing its consulting arm by teaching other energy rating firms the tricks of the trade. Byers said that by consulting with other firms throughout the country, EnergyLogic is able to spread its message without having to grow geographically.

EnergyLogic Inc. principal Steve Byers saw earlier than most the growing need for sustainable practices.

In 1992, upon completing his service to the U.S. Air Force, Byers became an intern at Georgia-based Southface Energy Institute. The non-profit focuses on providing environmental education and outreach. Byers’ time at Southface gave him the experience and tools he needed to start his own venture.

Byers’ wife, Wynne Maggi, is a Berthoud native, so the couple decided to settle back into the small Northern Colorado town to start EnergySmiths, an energy rating firm with a focus on consulting with homebuilders in the region, in 2001.

The business grew quickly, riding a tidal wave of new residential construction along the Front Range. EnergyLogic provides consultation on methods and tools for reducing energy consumption and overall environmental impact. The company’s revenues more than doubled in three years, with almost $890,000 in 2006.

Byers found that there was a familiar face appearing at many of the bids he was trying to land for EnergySmith. Robby Schwartz owned Denver-based energy ratings firm BuiltWright Inc. The two decided that it was in the best interest for the companies to join forces and in January 2006 the two merged to become EnergyLogic.

Today, the company operates three offices and employs 20 people. However, growth going forward is likely to be more measured and deliberate. The housing market has definitely cooled, slowing the growth of EnergyLogic’s core business.

“It’s definitely dropped off, but we are continuing to grow,” Byers said.

EnergyLogic, the 2007 Bravo! Emerging Entrepreneur, is…