January 1, 1998

When consumer safety’s an issue, who’s looking out for you?

When purchasing consumer goods, such as water treatment units, kitchen appliances or plumbing fixtures, how can you be sure the products meet acceptable health standards? How do you know if the manufacturer’s claims are true? Who’s looking out for you?

If you’re faced with health and safety concerns you may want to look for the NSF Mark or “seal of approval.” Perhaps you’ve already noticed a round blue mark bearing the initials NSF on products you’ve purchased. Knowing what it signifies may influence your future buying decisions.

The NSFMark represents an endorsement from NSF International, an independent, not-for-profit organization that has developed national standards for more than 50 years that promote and protect environmental and public health.

What exactly does NSF certification mean to you?

“It means that consumers, health officials and manufacturers can have confidence in the performance and safety of products bearing the NSF Mark,” states Stan Hazan, director of marketing at NSF. “It means you can have confidence that manufacturer’s claims are true and that the products you buy meet public health and performance standards without posing unnecessary risks.”

In the areas of water, food and the environment, NSF tests and certifies products from around the world to assure they meet NSF and other national standards. “NSF certification programs are accredited by the American National Standards Institute, or ANSI, in the United States and by RvA, the Dutch Council for Accreditation in Europe, assuring compliance with stringent requirements,” Hazan adds.

“With international network partners, we deliver service to clients in more than 60 countries. In 1996, NSF International also was selected by the World Health Organization as a Collaborating Center on Drinking Water Safety and Treatment.”

Today, consumers can find millions of products bearing the NSF mark, including:

* Food equipment;

* Drinking water treatment chemicals and water distribution products;

* Plastics piping system components;

* Point-of-use and point-of-entry drinking water treatment units;

* Bottled water and packaged ice;

* Wastewater treatment plants and devices;

* Swimming pool, hot tub, and spa equipment;

* Biohazard cabinetry;

* ISO 9000 quality management systems registration;

* ISO 14000 environmental management systems registration.

“All of the above NSF certification programs are accepted and frequently mandated by public health regulators throughout the United States and around the world,” notes Hazan.

For information on services call 800/NSF-MARK between 8 a.m and 5 p.m. Eastern Time. Or visit their Web site at www.nsf.org, where you’ll find information and news on certification programs, a free searchable database listing NSF Certified products, and a complete library of NSF standards.

Courtesy of Article Resource Association, www.aracopy.com.

When purchasing consumer goods, such as water treatment units, kitchen appliances or plumbing fixtures, how can you be sure the products meet acceptable health standards? How do you know if the manufacturer’s claims are true? Who’s looking out for you?

If you’re faced with health and safety concerns you may want to look for the NSF Mark or “seal of approval.” Perhaps you’ve already noticed a round blue mark bearing the initials NSF on products you’ve purchased. Knowing what it signifies may influence your future buying decisions.

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