Datu Health hiring for new HQ in Boulder

BOULDER – Datu Health Inc., a high-tech startup working in the health-care industry, is hiring for its new headquarters in Boulder.

The company officially launched as an independent company a week ago and has had an office in Boulder for about two months.

Datu Health is hiring user-experience engineers, creative designers and developers and expects to have 25 employees on board – all of them new hires -in Boulder by the end of August and at least 35 by the end of the year.

Datu, at 1590 Broadway Ave. in 3,600 square feet of space at the old power substation at Marine Street and Broadway, provides a cloud software platform that helps large health systems manage medical records more efficiently to help doctors, nurses and patients.

Launched about 18 months ago as a division of Bick Group in St. Louis, the company formerly was known as BickHealth before a pair of investors helped the company break off on its own. The most recent of those investors is St. Joseph Health, a 16-hospital system serving California, Texas and New Mexico that will have the Datu platform up and running sometime in the first quarter of 2014.

Datu will maintain an office in St. Louis, but chief strategy officer Kevin Dodson will move to Boulder to oversee the headquarters.

“To be where the talent is, we had to be there,” Dodson said of Boulder’s rich technology base. “We’re growing like gangbusters now.”

Dodson declined to divulge specifics of “the significant amount of money” invested by St. Joseph Health, but the company is clearly a believer in the product.

Datu’s platform is a way for large health systems to integrate their individual software systems without the expense of migrating each hospital or clinic to new systems. Instead of migration, Datu uploads data from each location and presents it in an intuitive user interface that can be used by medical providers across the system.

In addition to patients also having better access to their own files, the Datu system can upload data from nonclinical systems. For instance, patients with the iBGStar blood glucose meter, which helps patients manage diabetes through their iPhones or iPods, can have the information from their iBGStar uploaded to Datu. Those patients’ physicians then have a better set of data for a patient’s overall health picture or how well a patient is keeping up with a treatment regimen over time.

The same type of idea could be used, for instance, with devices like Nike Fuel Bands, which can help track exercise activity. The platform, Dodson said, provides a new empowerment for not just healthcare providers but also patients.

“Now you have the availability to share that information with your provider to have better care,´ said Dodson, who said Datu is talking with other large national healthcare systems about integrating its software once the launch at St. Joseph Health is complete.


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